Liquid Propulsion

Liquid Propulsion Modeling and Fluid Flow Design

The NASA standard tool for heat transfer and fluid flow analysis, SINDA/FLUINT, includes thermodynamic and hydrodynamic solutions specifically targeted at the growing demand for design and analysis of liquid propulsion systems.

Many organizations have previously used separate in-house tools specialized for each of the above applications. However, these organizations typically do not have the resources nor infrastructure to maintain these codes when cognizant engineers are lost, nor to modify and validate them for new vehicles or applications, nor to train new engineers on their use. The use of a single general-purpose tool to encompass all such analyses offers not only solutions to these problems, but also enables integrated analyses and the ability to communicate with vendors and customers.

An extensive set of generalized thermal/fluid modeling tools exists that was developed to satisfy the specialized needs of liquid propulsion system design and analysis. These tools can uniquely provide integrated modeling of an entire fuel tank system including pressurization system, feedline, and turbopump. They can also link intimately with thermal models of the structure and environment. Included are high-level design synthesis, statistical design, and model correlation modules. An extensive infrastructure exists of pre- and postprocessing software, training, and user support. While the models made using these tools might be proprietary, the tools themselves are readily available to all organizations, overcoming significant limitations of in-house codes.

Propulsion Design Applications

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For further information, please contact CRTech

Reacting Flows

Tuesday May 5th, 2pm MT (1pm PT, 4pm ET)

Reacting Flows is a capability that allows FloCAD to simulate fuel reformers, deal with the electrochemistry of flow batteries, predict combustion reactions in gas generations, and work with ionized and dissociated gases.

This webinar will explain how to use a working fluid as a reactant. It will also detail various options for determining reaction rates such as equilibrium, finite rate with stoichiometric coefficients, and percent complete based on inflowing reagents. Example applications are summarized.

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Dissolved Gases

Thursday May 7th, 2pm MT (1pm PT, 4pm ET)

When vapor meets liquid, it can condense. When gas (NCG) meets liquid, it can dissolve. When there is too much gas in the liquid, it can either evolve slowly at a wall or at the surface ... or it can come out explosively.

Whether your interests are environmental control, liquid propulsion, fire retardant delivery, or beer, this webinar offers a rare glimpse into an advanced modeling topic.

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