Fluid Properties

Caution: All fluid property ("FPROP") files are provided as a convenience, not as supported products. Use at your own risk, and be sure to validate with other sources. The majority of these files are based on NIST data using REFPROP. These files are updated as new data becomes available and corrections are made without notice; be sure to check back often to make sure you are using the latest versions.

Below are links to download common fluid property descriptions. For a more extensive list of properties which are available from CRTech (or to request a fluid property file, or for help developing a custom fluid file), please review our full table of property descriptions.

Note: The full library of fluid properties are included by installing SINDA/FLUINT Version 6.0 or later. The property files are installed in the public documents folder, which is automatically listed within the FloCAD property browser (a feature of the fluid submodel manager). Those installed files are pre-compiled for faster preprocessing and loading. The files listed below are not normally needed; they are provided a courtesy for customers running older versions of SINDA/FLUINT or who need special or custom variations of the standard collection of properties.

The fluid property descriptions are available for CRTech customers and are in a format that is only compatible with CRTech Software

Air Properties
Ammonia Properties
Argon Properties
Carbon Dioxide Properties
Fluorinertâ„¢ Properties
Helium Properties
Hydrogen Properties
Methane Properties
Nitrogen Properties
Oxygen Properties
R134a Properties
Water Properties

Reacting Flows

Tuesday May 5th, 2pm MT (1pm PT, 4pm ET)

Reacting Flows is a capability that allows FloCAD to simulate fuel reformers, deal with the electrochemistry of flow batteries, predict combustion reactions in gas generations, and work with ionized and dissociated gases.

This webinar will explain how to use a working fluid as a reactant. It will also detail various options for determining reaction rates such as equilibrium, finite rate with stoichiometric coefficients, and percent complete based on inflowing reagents. Example applications are summarized.

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Dissolved Gases

Thursday May 7th, 2pm MT (1pm PT, 4pm ET)

When vapor meets liquid, it can condense. When gas (NCG) meets liquid, it can dissolve. When there is too much gas in the liquid, it can either evolve slowly at a wall or at the surface ... or it can come out explosively.

Whether your interests are environmental control, liquid propulsion, fire retardant delivery, or beer, this webinar offers a rare glimpse into an advanced modeling topic.

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