Fluid Properties

Caution: All fluid property ("FPROP") files are provided as a convenience, not as supported products. Use at your own risk, and be sure to validate with other sources. The majority of these files are based on NIST data using REFPROP. These files are updated as new data becomes available and corrections are made without notice; be sure to check back often to make sure you are using the latest versions.

Below are links to download common fluid property descriptions. For a more extensive list of properties which are available from CRTech (or to request a fluid property file, or for help developing a custom fluid file), please review our full table of property descriptions.

Note: The full library of fluid properties are included by installing SINDA/FLUINT Version 6.0 or later. The property files are installed in the public documents folder, which is automatically listed within the FloCAD property browser (a feature of the fluid submodel manager). Those installed files are pre-compiled for faster preprocessing and loading. The files listed below are not normally needed; they are provided a courtesy for customers running older versions of SINDA/FLUINT or who need special or custom variations of the standard collection of properties.

The fluid property descriptions are available for CRTech customers and are in a format that is only compatible with CRTech Software

Air Properties
Ammonia Properties
Argon Properties
Carbon Dioxide Properties
Fluorinertâ„¢ Properties
Helium Properties
Hydrogen Properties
Methane Properties
Nitrogen Properties
Oxygen Properties
R134a Properties
Water Properties

Vapor Compression Cycles

Tuesday March 10th, 2pm MST

This webinar explains how the toolbox approach of Thermal Desktop and FloCAD can be used to design and simulate vapor compression cycles at various levels of detail. Applications include heat pumps, automotive climate control, and refrigeration systems.

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Working Fluid Mixtures

Thursday March 12th, 2pm MST

Working fluid mixtures can be as simple as air and water. Or as complex as ... well, air and water.

"Air" might be a simple perfect gas or a collection of real gases ... itself a mixture. "Water" might be a simple nonvolatile approximation of liquid water, or it might be a volatile liquid.

This webinar discusses mixture types, and repercussions such as pressure and temperature range limits. It illustrates both how to set initial conditions and how to determine what is going on in results.

Click here to register