Line Chilldown

Line Chilldown Using Liquid Hydrogen and Liquid Nitrogen

This validation case compares SINDA/FLUINT and FloCAD® predictions with a 1966 test by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS, now National Institute of Standards and Technology, NIST). In the NBS tests, a pressurized dewar containing either LN2 or LH2 was isolated from an empty 200ft (61m) line (open to the atmosphere) by a valve. At time zero, the valve between the dewar and the line was opened, and cryogenic liquid was allowed to flow until the line was completely full and liquid was discharged from open end of the pipe.

Test Set-up

Comparison with Test Data

Liquid (Normal) Hydrogen, Comparison with Figure 7

Differences between parahydrogen and normal hydrogen are explored, since the exact composition of the hydrogen is unknown. The importance of uncertainties in heat transfer and pressure drop correlations, copper alloy properties (also unknown), dewar pressure, and even the roughness and manufacturing tolerance of the tubing is explored. This study demonstrates automated calibration to test data, and investigation of sensitivities.

Click here to fetch the Cryogenic Cooldown Validation from our User Forum

Download the full Line Chilldown Validation report

See also LNG chilldown of a flexible composite hose

Reacting Flows

Tuesday May 5th, 2pm MT (1pm PT, 4pm ET)

Reacting Flows is a capability that allows FloCAD to simulate fuel reformers, deal with the electrochemistry of flow batteries, predict combustion reactions in gas generations, and work with ionized and dissociated gases.

This webinar will explain how to use a working fluid as a reactant. It will also detail various options for determining reaction rates such as equilibrium, finite rate with stoichiometric coefficients, and percent complete based on inflowing reagents. Example applications are summarized.

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Dissolved Gases

Thursday May 7th, 2pm MT (1pm PT, 4pm ET)

When vapor meets liquid, it can condense. When gas (NCG) meets liquid, it can dissolve. When there is too much gas in the liquid, it can either evolve slowly at a wall or at the surface ... or it can come out explosively.

Whether your interests are environmental control, liquid propulsion, fire retardant delivery, or beer, this webinar offers a rare glimpse into an advanced modeling topic.

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