Thermoelastic Analysis

Providing Temperature Results for Structural and Stress Analyses

C&R Thermal Desktop® allows a thermal engineer and structural engineer to work side by side sharing the same CAD information or design drawings, while both engineers build distinct models that are each honed for their individual needs: even when detailed thermoelastic deformation analysis is needed. In other words, Thermal Desktop's unique model mapping methods means that the thermal model need not be the same as, nor derived from, the structural model.

While Thermal Desktop can directly import all or part of structural FEM models, that step is not necessary to accomplish the accurate export of temperatures and other thermal data back to a structural code for thermal/structural analysis. Pitfalls of competing approaches are avoided, including requirements for "one-to-one" thermal-structural model correspondence and the errors associated with using the structural model to do the mapping.

Thermal Desktop allows an appropriate thermal model to be built using geometric surfaces and solids that are not faceted, and hence do not lose surface area needed for accurate thermal radiation, convection, and contact conductance calculations. It also allows a thermally appropriate mesh that avoids unnecessary details. Thermal Desktop users can create their thermal/fluid models using whatever combinations of finite elements, finite differences, and lumped parameters suit their needs.

When the time comes to produce temperatures for structural analyzers such as NASTRAN or ANSYS, those temperatures are produced at the desired structural element points using the most accurate representation possible: the shape functions and interpolation methods used to produce the temperatures in the first place. 

  Thermal Model Structural Model
Telescope Shell Thermal model of telescope shell Structural model of telescope shell with mapped temperatures
Mirror Support Thermal model of mirror support Structural model of mirror support with mapped temperatures

For example, the thermal models at the left were built independently from the corresponding structural models at the right. All models were generated from the same CAD information. The thermal model for the telescope shell uses mostly finite differences, while the thermal model for the mirror support uses mostly finite elements. In both cases, temperatures can be mapped to the independent structural model with a single command.

In fact, using the Dynamic Mode in Thermal Desktop, such mappings can be made "on the fly" as part of the analysis procedure during a transient analysis (e.g., "estimate deflections or thermal stresses every time slice") or as part a parametric sweep ("estimate thermoelastic responses of each design"). This is possible even if the structural model itself changes between each mapping. This "hands off" automated thermal/structural analysis enables design optimization, statistical design, worst case seeking, etc.

Choking and High-speed Flow

Tuesday December 17th, 2pm MST

When flow velocities get big, things gets interesting. Above Mach=0.1, the bulk fluid "sees" a wall that is warmer than the structural temperature due to deceleration within the boundary layer. Above Mach=0.3, kinetic energy changes cease to be negligible. And of course, nothing moves faster than Mach=1.0 for internal flow. When you also add in changes in flow area, or changes in phase ... well, let's just say that doesn't simplify anything.

This webinar will introduce you to the phenomena involved, with a focus on the FloCAD modeling parameters available and their associated correlations and assumptions.

Click here to register

Turbomachinery and Rotating Passages (Secondary Flows)

Thursday December 19th, 2pm MST

Are turbomachines a component in your system, and you'd like to treat them as a "black box"?

Or are they the focus of your work, and the cycle is just a boundary condition to you?

Either way, this webinar will have something to offer you. Each type of turbomachine will be covered: pumps and fans, positive and variable displacement compressors, and turbines (whether gas or hydraulic). Methods for modeling systems like turbochargers and turbopumps will be introduced. Tools for handling spinning flow passages and rotating cavities will be presented.

Click here to register

Starting in 2020, we will begin offering Introduction to Thermal Desktop and Introduction to RadCAD as either in-person training or online training, alternating between online and in-person every three months. The training uses lectures and demonstrations to introduce you to basic Thermal Desktop and RadCAD usage. Hands-on tutorials provide practice building models and interpreting results (tutorials are completed by students outside of the online class time).
 
The next training class will be an online format in January 2020:
  • Introduction to Thermal Desktop (and SINDA) - A three-part series on January 14, 16, and 21 from 9am to 12pm, Mountain time
  • Introduction to RadCAD - January 23 from 9am to 12pm, Mountain time
For up-to-date schedules, fees, and policies, visit our Product Training page. To register for the class above, complete our registration form and select "Online" for the Training Format.
 
If you are interested in product training for your company based on your schedule, please contact us to obtain a quote for training between 8-12 attendees. We can come to your facility or the lectures can be presented online. Descriptions of the available classes can be found in our course catalog.
 
To keep up with our training opportunities, take a look at our new Events and Training Calendar.