Wisconsin Racing Formula SAE

Wisconsin Racing: Energy storage acculators for electric vehicle

Wisconsin Racing is an organization of students from the University of Wisconsin which compete in the design, fabrication, and racing of two Formula 1 style race cars in the SAE Collegiate Design Competitions. The organization allows students to gain experience and take part in all skills necessary for survival in corporate America

The team consists of 5 groups: Chassis, Powertrain, Composites, Electrical, and Business. The Chassis group focuses on frame design and suspension, while powertrain focuses on the powerplant and supporting systems. The composites group is concerned with car aerodynamics and structural/non-structural design using carbon fiber. The Electrical group is responsible for design and wire of an extremely complex turbocharged fuel injection and data acquisition system. They are also responsible for writing engine control strategy and designing a F1 style steering wheel, fully equipped with paddle shifting and electronic brake bias adjustment.

Using software provided through CRTech's University Investment Program, the Electrical group is using Thermal Desktop, RadCAD, and SINDA/FLUINT to analyze the power storage system for their vehicle. Future plans include modeling of the braking system and electric motors.

CRTech is proud to be sponsoring these students and we hope they do well in the 2017 Formula SAE® competition.

 

Reacting Flows

Tuesday May 5th, 2pm MT (1pm PT, 4pm ET)

Reacting Flows is a capability that allows FloCAD to simulate fuel reformers, deal with the electrochemistry of flow batteries, predict combustion reactions in gas generations, and work with ionized and dissociated gases.

This webinar will explain how to use a working fluid as a reactant. It will also detail various options for determining reaction rates such as equilibrium, finite rate with stoichiometric coefficients, and percent complete based on inflowing reagents. Example applications are summarized.

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Dissolved Gases

Thursday May 7th, 2pm MT (1pm PT, 4pm ET)

When vapor meets liquid, it can condense. When gas (NCG) meets liquid, it can dissolve. When there is too much gas in the liquid, it can either evolve slowly at a wall or at the surface ... or it can come out explosively.

Whether your interests are environmental control, liquid propulsion, fire retardant delivery, or beer, this webinar offers a rare glimpse into an advanced modeling topic.

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