Thermal Modeling of Phoenix Cubesat

by Johnathan Gamaunt, Arizona State University 

The Phoenix CubeSat is an undergraduate-led 3u CubeSat designed to study Urban Heat Islands through infrared imaging.   The Phoenix mission is an educational mission, where our primary goal is to develop a functioning CubSat, capable of imaging the Earth in the IR spectrum.  The data collected form the mission will support the study of how city composition, using local climate zones, affects the surface Urban Heat Island signature in major U.S. cities. 

The success of this mission depends on maintaining all components within their operating temperatures for component survival, and keeping the camera thermally stable in a specific temperature range to get usable science data.  Thermal Desktop gave us an analysis environment to make these temperature predictions and solve complex thermal models.  Thermal Desktop has a simple feel about it that allows you to build and customize your design in an intuitive way.  Using the Logic Manager, I was able to model all of the satellite rotations in orbit for imaging.  I was also able to model all of our TVAC tests and correlating real data to the thermal model to fine tune the real flight predicts. 

Thanks to C&R Technology for providing the Phoenix CubeSat program access to this software; because of this experience I was able to obtain an internship at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory where I was able to future develop my Thermal Desktop skills. 

 

Reacting Flows

Tuesday May 5th, 2pm MT (1pm PT, 4pm ET)

Reacting Flows is a capability that allows FloCAD to simulate fuel reformers, deal with the electrochemistry of flow batteries, predict combustion reactions in gas generations, and work with ionized and dissociated gases.

This webinar will explain how to use a working fluid as a reactant. It will also detail various options for determining reaction rates such as equilibrium, finite rate with stoichiometric coefficients, and percent complete based on inflowing reagents. Example applications are summarized.

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Dissolved Gases

Thursday May 7th, 2pm MT (1pm PT, 4pm ET)

When vapor meets liquid, it can condense. When gas (NCG) meets liquid, it can dissolve. When there is too much gas in the liquid, it can either evolve slowly at a wall or at the surface ... or it can come out explosively.

Whether your interests are environmental control, liquid propulsion, fire retardant delivery, or beer, this webinar offers a rare glimpse into an advanced modeling topic.

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